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définition - Praise of pip

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In Praise of Pip

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  (Redirected from Praise of pip)
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"In Praise of Pip"
The Twilight Zone episode

Scene from "In Praise of Pip"
Episode no.Season 5
Episode 121
Written byRod Serling
Directed byJoseph M. Newman
Featured musicRene Garriguenc, conducted by Lud Gluskin
Production no.2607
Original airdateSeptember 27, 1963
Guest stars

Jack Klugman: Max Phillips
Billy Mumy: Young Pip Phillips
Bobby Diamond: Private Pip Phillips

Episode chronology
← PreviousNext →
"The Bard""Steel"
List of Twilight Zone episodes

"In Praise of Pip" is an episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

This appearance would be Jack Klugman's fourth and final appearance on the series, tying him with Burgess Meredith for the most number by any guest.

Also, this was the first episode of The Twilight Zone to be 30 minutes long since The Changing of the Guard.

Contents

Opening narration

Submitted for your approval, one Max Phillips, a slightly-the-worse-for-wear maker of book, whose life has been as drab and undistinguished as a bundle of dirty clothes. And, though it's very late in his day, he has an errant wish that the rest of his life might be sent out to a laundry to come back shiny and clean, this to be a gift of love to a son named Pip. Mr. Max Phillips, Homo Sapiens, who is soon to discover that man is not as wise as he thinks— said lesson to be learned in the Twilight Zone.

Synopsis

Max Phillips is a bookie who finds out that his son is dying in Vietnam. He feels he could have been a better father. With that in mind, he returns $300 to an unlucky bettor and gets into a fight with his boss and the boss' hitman. Max is shot by the hitman. Mortally wounded, he stumbles into an amusement park and is surprised to meet his son, who is now a child again. After having some fun, reliving past enjoyable outings, the young boy runs away. When Max finds him, the son explains that he is dying and vanishes. Max makes a deal with God: His life for Pip's. He dies so that his son may live.

Closing narration

Very little comment here, save for this small aside: that the ties of flesh are deep and strong, that the capacity to love is a vital, rich and all-consuming function of the human animal, and that you can find nobility and sacrifice and love wherever you may seek it out; down the block, in the heart, or in the "Twilight Zone".

Preview for next week's story

Announcer: "And now, Mr. Serling."

Next on Twilight Zone, we dabble in the manly arts with a show called "Steel." Written especially for us by Richard Matheson, this one isn't just for prizefighting buffs, because the story is above and beyond anything remotely involving the Marquis of Queensberry. Rather, it's a tender, touching and tough analysis of some very bizarre people. Lee Marvin and Joe Mantell take a walk in The Twilight Zone next, in "Steel".

Episode notes

The episode was filmed on location at the Pacific Ocean Park in Santa Monica, California.

This was the first episode sponsored by American Tobacco (on alternate weeks), on behalf of Pall Mall cigarettes, who suggested that Rod and some of the guest stars and supporting players "light up" during the episodes. Unlike previous sponsor Liggett & Myers, American Tobacco did not have Rod plug their products at the end of the program.

References

  • Zicree, Marc Scott: The Twilight Zone Companion. Sillman-James Press, 1982 (second edition)
  • DeVoe, Bill. (2008). Trivia from The Twilight Zone. Albany, GA: Bear Manor Media. ISBN 978-1593931360
  • Grams, Martin. (2008). The Twilight Zone: Unlocking the Door to a Television Classic. Churchville, MD: OTR Publishing. ISBN 978-0970331090

External links

In Praise of Pip

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  (Redirected from Praise of Pip)
Jump to: navigation, search
"In Praise of Pip"
The Twilight Zone episode

Scene from "In Praise of Pip"
Episode no.Season 5
Episode 121
Written byRod Serling
Directed byJoseph M. Newman
Featured musicRene Garriguenc, conducted by Lud Gluskin
Production no.2607
Original airdateSeptember 27, 1963
Guest stars

Jack Klugman: Max Phillips
Billy Mumy: Young Pip Phillips
Bobby Diamond: Private Pip Phillips

Episode chronology
← PreviousNext →
"The Bard""Steel"
List of Twilight Zone episodes

"In Praise of Pip" is an episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone.

This appearance would be Jack Klugman's fourth and final appearance on the series, tying him with Burgess Meredith for the most number by any guest.

Also, this was the first episode of The Twilight Zone to be 30 minutes long since The Changing of the Guard.

Contents

Opening narration

Submitted for your approval, one Max Phillips, a slightly-the-worse-for-wear maker of book, whose life has been as drab and undistinguished as a bundle of dirty clothes. And, though it's very late in his day, he has an errant wish that the rest of his life might be sent out to a laundry to come back shiny and clean, this to be a gift of love to a son named Pip. Mr. Max Phillips, Homo Sapiens, who is soon to discover that man is not as wise as he thinks— said lesson to be learned in the Twilight Zone.

Synopsis

Max Phillips is a bookie who finds out that his son is dying in Vietnam. He feels he could have been a better father. With that in mind, he returns $300 to an unlucky bettor and gets into a fight with his boss and the boss' hitman. Max is shot by the hitman. Mortally wounded, he stumbles into an amusement park and is surprised to meet his son, who is now a child again. After having some fun, reliving past enjoyable outings, the young boy runs away. When Max finds him, the son explains that he is dying and vanishes. Max makes a deal with God: His life for Pip's. He dies so that his son may live.

Closing narration

Very little comment here, save for this small aside: that the ties of flesh are deep and strong, that the capacity to love is a vital, rich and all-consuming function of the human animal, and that you can find nobility and sacrifice and love wherever you may seek it out; down the block, in the heart, or in the "Twilight Zone".

Preview for next week's story

Announcer: "And now, Mr. Serling."

Next on Twilight Zone, we dabble in the manly arts with a show called "Steel." Written especially for us by Richard Matheson, this one isn't just for prizefighting buffs, because the story is above and beyond anything remotely involving the Marquis of Queensberry. Rather, it's a tender, touching and tough analysis of some very bizarre people. Lee Marvin and Joe Mantell take a walk in The Twilight Zone next, in "Steel".

Episode notes

The episode was filmed on location at the Pacific Ocean Park in Santa Monica, California.

This was the first episode sponsored by American Tobacco (on alternate weeks), on behalf of Pall Mall cigarettes, who suggested that Rod and some of the guest stars and supporting players "light up" during the episodes. Unlike previous sponsor Liggett & Myers, American Tobacco did not have Rod plug their products at the end of the program.

References

  • Zicree, Marc Scott: The Twilight Zone Companion. Sillman-James Press, 1982 (second edition)
  • DeVoe, Bill. (2008). Trivia from The Twilight Zone. Albany, GA: Bear Manor Media. ISBN 978-1593931360
  • Grams, Martin. (2008). The Twilight Zone: Unlocking the Door to a Television Classic. Churchville, MD: OTR Publishing. ISBN 978-0970331090

External links

 

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